Dept of Justice Soldiers and Prisoners as “human guinea pigs.” Petroleum CO GMO based Drugs

Nature’s Pharmacy:

Rockefeller was born in 1839 in Moravia, a small town in western New York. His father practiced herbal medicine, professing to cure patients with remedies he had created from plants in the area.

Always thrifty, Rockefeller saved enough money to start his own business in produce sales. When the Civil War came, the demand for his goods increased dramatically, and Rockefeller found himself amassing a small fortune.

Rockefeller took advantage of the loophole in the Union draft law by ‘purchasing a substitute’ to avoid military service. When Edwin Drake discovered oil in 1859 in Titusville, Pennsylvania, Rockefeller saw the future. He slowly sold off his other interests and became convinced that refining oil would bring him great wealth. From Plants to Oil to plants Retirement, liberated Rockefeller more to enjoy nature. On his estate in New York, he studied plants and flowers. Sometimes he would drive out into the countryside just to admire a wheat field. To all of us we are afforded only

Petroleum Drugs

The Mission was Destroying any Competition to Western Medicine whereby, “human guinea pigs.”would be needed and soldiers and prisoners meet that demand.

Rockefeller saw that there were many types of doctors and healing modalities in existence at that time, from chiropractry to naturopathy to homeopathy to holistic medicine to herbal medicine and more. He wanted to eliminate the competitors of western medicine (the only modality which would propose drugs and radiation as treatment, thus enriching Rockefeller who owned the means to produce these treatments), so he hired a man called Abraham Flexner to submit a report to Congress in 1910. This report “concluded” that there were too many doctors and medical schools in America, and that all the natural healing modalities which had existed for hundreds or thousands of years were unscientific quackery. It called for the standardization of medical education, whereby only the allopathic-based AMA be allowed to grant medical school licenses in the US.

Thanks for the drugs. NativePlants better Now

Thanks for the drugs. but #NativePlants better Now

Mike Brown Ghetto Food Hemp FireWeedFireweed is an herb. The parts of the plant that grow above ground are used to make medicine. Fireweed is used for pain and swelling (inflammation), fevers, tumors, wounds, and enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia, BPH). It is also used as an astringent and as a tonic.

One Tire At A Time! Help Us Remove This Ocean Pollution!

One Tire At A Time! Help Us Remove This Ocean Pollution!

While there are A distinct variety of the plant species  like the Cannabis sativa L., or the the hemp plant harvested for its fibers, seed, seed meal and seed oil. Marijuana is a group of flowering plants that includes three species of Cannabis, all indigenous to Central Asia and surrounding regions, but both Hemp and Cannabis can be readily grown in many regions throughout the world.

There have been over eight million Cannabis arrests in the United States since 1993, including 786,545 arrests in 2005, and Cannabis users have been arrested at the rate of 1 every 40 seconds. Statistics show that about 88% of all marijuana arrests are for simple possession, not manufacture or distribution, according to FBI Uniform Crimes Report. Large-scale marijuana growing operations are frequently targeted by police in raids to attack the supply side and discourage the spread and marketing of the drug, though the great majority of those who are in prison for cannabis are either there for simple possession or small scale dealing.

The effects of marijuana prohibition in the United States today are similar to the effects of alcohol prohibition in the United States from 1920 to 1933. Prohibition sought to achieve forced abstinence from alcohol through legal means and constitutionally banned its manufacture, sale and transport throughout the United States.

A number of social problems resulted from the Prohibition era. A profitable and violent black market for alcohol flourished. Powerful gangs corrupted law enforcement agencies, and stronger liquor surged in popularity because its potency made it more profitable to smuggle. Enforcing prohibition had an enormous price tag, and the absence of almost $500 million annual nationwide tax revenues on alcohol affected the government’s financial resources. When repeal of prohibition occurred in 1933, organized crime lost nearly all of its black market alcohol profits in most states because of competition with low-priced alcohol sales at legal liquor stores.

At the end of prohibition some of the initial supporters openly admitted its failure. A quote from a letter, written in 1932 by wealthy industrialist John D. Rockefeller, Jr., states:

“When Prohibition was introduced, I hoped that it would be widely supported by public opinion and the day would soon come when the evil effects of alcohol would be recognized. I have slowly and reluctantly come to believe that this has not been the result. Instead, drinking has generally increased; the speakeasy has replaced the saloon; a vast army of lawbreakers has appeared; many of our best citizens have openly ignored Prohibition; respect for the law has been greatly lessened; and crime has increased to a level never seen before.”

However, when it came to marijuana and hemp prohibition, Rockefeller took a different stance. He was a known supporter of hemp prohibition along with Harry J. Anslinger, the United States First “drug czar” and William Randolph Hearst, well known media mogul. As to be expected, Hearst sympathized with the drug czar in his war against marijuana. Hearst’s paper empire, which included hundreds of acres of timber forests, was threatened by the renewable resource of hemp that could be re-grown yearly, unlike Hearst’s timber. In his newspapers, Hearst published many of Anslinger’s fabricated stories, aiding the anti-marijuana movement that eventually led to its prohibition in the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act. Rockefeller had his interests in oil, and after founding Standard Oil in 1870, soared to become the first U.S. dollar billionaire, and Standard Oil was even convicted of monopolistic practices and broken up in 1911. There seems no way that hemp could have had a chance when the media, the government, and the oil industry were swiftly making little room for hemp to survive.

Hemp is not only in direct competition with timber and petroleum, but also with many other industries throughout the world. Hemp offers wholesome and nutritious foodstuffs such as edible oil from the seeds, which are also used for making chocolate bars and other foods; renewable fiber for clothing and building. The original Levi jeans were made from hemp but lasted too long to be commercially viable; high grade papers, such as those used for bank notes, tissues, hand towels, and tea bags, where strength when wet is critical, and so much more. Cannabis is a medicine that was created by nature, producing powerful documented results without the side effects of the manufactured chemicals that the drug companies peddle during every television commercial break. Cannabis can even be a nice after work treat in the same way that a glass of beer or wine is enjoyed after a long day at the office.

PanAridus

One hundred years ago, inventor Thomas Edison, auto maker Henry Ford and industrialist John D. Rockefeller recognized the need for the United States to have its own domestically grown source of natural rubber for manufacturing and for national security at a time when war was becoming increasingly mechanized. At that time, most of the world’s rubber was grown in Brazil, and the trade was monopolized by Great Britain.

#FightforDyett Syllabus #FergusonSyllabus  #BostonSyllabus; #washingtonDCSyllabus #ChicagoSyllabus Our Treasure Chest: Why We Must Conserve Our Natural Heritage A Native Plant Conservation Campaign Report

Source: Dept of Justice prisoners as “human guinea pigs.”

Mike Brown Native Plant Institute (MBNPI ) Oh Higher Learning Walnut Park St. Louis MO The Sudy of Traditional Herbal Herbs and Shrubs

White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier – The …

Georgia Chicago Los Angeles Schools out of parental control to the state

Enter Arizona, the home of a native Sonoran Desert plant called guayule (why-you-ly). A hundred years ago, it was touted by names like Edison, Firestone, Ford and Rockefeller as the panacea for our nation’s rubber shortage. Ironically, it even appeared on the front page of the New York Times on December 7th 1941, touted as a backstop supply of rubber in case of Japanese aggression. Shortly thereafter, over 25,000 acres was put into production as part of the war effort.

Unfortunately, like every other time guayule has cropped up, worldwide prices or geopolitics have conspired to cut it down before long-term research could be done–until now.

  • Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) is native to the southwestern United States and may be a natural source of hypoallergenic latex because large quantities of rubber accumulated in its cells lack the latex proteins that cause allergic reactions. Preliminary tests show that guayule latex film may be an effective barrier to virus transmission, even after long-term storage.
  • On October 1, 1911, Charles Gates Sr. purchased the Colorado Tire and Leather Company located in Denver, Colorado beside the South Platte River. He paid $3,500 for a property that would one day become one of the world’s largest manufacturers of power transmission belts and a leader in hydraulic and fluid power products for industrial and automotive products.[1]Colorado Tire and Leather Company made a single product, the Durable Tread, a steel-studded band of leather that motorists attached to tires to extend their mileage. In 1917, the company began phasing out leather in favor of rubber and Charles Gates changed its name to the International Rubber Company.That same year, John Gates, Charles’s brother, developed a belt made of rubber and woven threading called a V-belt, due to its shape. It replaced the hemp and rope belt used on automobiles and industrial machinery at the time, and was a model for the common serpentine belt. The belt’s success propelled the company to become the largest manufacturer of V-belts, a title it still holds.[

The New York Times
Dec 24, 2014 – The mean proportion of African ancestry for African-Americans across the United States. African-Americans in Georgia and South Carolina …
I’m White, but Tests Show I Have East African DNA. How …

Jan 23, 2015 – Tracing Your Roots: Finding African ancestry wasn’t as shocking to him … to the Southern U.S., this seems fairly likely to reflect West African ancestry … Who would dare to show that 1% African and get classified as Black in America? …. I’ve found through DNA matches it likely comes from Georgia where a …


DNA rewrites history for African-Americans – USA Today
USA Today
Feb 1, 2006 – Melvin Collier, of Lithia Springs, Ga., is using DNA to research his family … of black Americans who take DNA tests to determine their African …
Genetic study reveals surprising ancestry of many Americans
Science
Dec 18, 2014 – Some African-Americans, European Americans, and Latinos carry genes … In the United States, almost no one can trace their ancestry back to just one place. … are from Louisiana, followed by states such as Georgia, North Carolina, New York, … which was also home to a significant number of black slaves.

Study proves Southern white people have more black DNA only when the lights are out.
The Grio
Dec 22, 2014 – Just like white people in the South had the most African ancestry, so did black people living in the south; with those in Georgia and South …

Demographics of Georgia (U.S. state)

The largest ancestry groups are:

30.5% Black or African American (including Hispanics)

8.8% Hispanics and Latinos of any race.[5]

10.8% American (mostly British descent),

9.5% Irish, 8.9% English and 8.2% German.[6]In the 1980 census

The Black/African American population is one of the most unique groups in the United … studied DNA samples from groups of African Americans throughout the US, … those of the Gullah Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia.

Ancestry DNA Makes Scientific Breakthrough in West African …

Sep 12, 2013 – It can be extremely difficult to research one’s African ancestry using … records alone, as most African American individuals in the U.S. are unable to find … birth locations in South Carolina and Georgia in the 1700’s and 1800’s.
The ethnic maps of America revealed by researchers

Daily Mail
Dec 19, 2014 – Researchers analyzed the genomes of more than 160,000 African Americans, … and South Carolina have the highest average percentage of African ancestry … of African Americans Across the Us. African Americans in Georgia and South …. People that speak Spanish in America can be white, black, asian, …

 No teacher’s appear in any of the videos’ taken the day Kendrick Johnson Was Last seen my his mom
VALDOSTA — Georgia State Senator-elect Ellis Black (R) and State Representatives Dexter Sharper (D) and Amy Carter (R) gave business leaders a snapshot of the 2015 legislative agenda at the Valdosta Country Club Wednesday afternoon.

Voting Demographics of South Carolina South Carolina and US census:

Hamitic(African American) (29.5%),

British(13.9%),English (8.4%),

German(8.4%),Irish(7.9%)

Union soldier with his personal Negus Child_ History don’t repeat man does

 

White Southerners Likely To Have More Black DNA Than …Technology › Science
International Business Times
Dec 23, 2014 – The study also found that states with the highest levels of African ancestry are … have more “black” DNA than white people in other parts of the United States, … with the highest levels of African ancestry, such as South Carolina, Georgia, … Only people with more than 50 percent African ancestry identified …
History Written In Our DNA –

Dec 18, 2014 – African Ancestry in White Americans … In Georgia and Alabama the number is about 9 percent. … Among black Americans, those with the highest percentage of African ancestry also live in southern states, … Among self-reported Latinos in the US, those from states in the southwest, especially from states …

The largest reported ancestry groups in Alabama:

African American (26.0%),

American (17.0%),

English (7.8%),

Irish (7.7%),

German (5.7%),

and Scots-Irish(2.0%).

‘American’ includes those reported as Native American or African American. [3][4]

LOST

CROPS

of

AFRICA

•African Rice (Oryza glabberima)
•Finger Millet (Eleusine coracana)
•Fonio (Digitaria exilis and D. iburua)
• Pearl Millet (Pennisetum species)
•Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)
•Tef (Eragrostis tef)
•Other cultivated grains (Brachiaria, Triticum,Paspalum, etc.)
•Wild grains (Echinochloa,Paspalum, etc.).
Volume II, which published in 2006, covers 18 vegetables:
•Amaranth (Amaranthus species)
•Bambara Bean (Vigna subterranea)
•Baobab (Adansonia digitata)
•Celosia (Celosia argentea)
•Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata)
•Dika (Irvingia species)
•Eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum)
•Egusi (Citrullus lanatus)
•Enset (Ensete ventricosum)
•Lablab (Lablab purpureus)
•Locust Bean (Parkia biglobosa)
•Long Bean (Vigna unguiculata)
•Marama (Tylosema esculentum)
•Moringa (Moringa oleifera)
•Native Potatoes (Solenostemon rotundifolius
and Plectranthusesculentus)
•Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus)
•Shea (Vitellaria paradoxa)
•Yambean (Sphenostylis stenocarpa)
For Bill Gates And Beyonce Knowles Global Citizen’s Africa’s fruits Native Plants can provide minerals and vitamins in locally available and attractive forms. They provide variety to the diet and taste buds,thereby enhancing the monotonous staples the impoverished masses endure day in and day out. They provide resources for small-scale horticultural enterprises and home gardens that represent a safety net for the rural regions and a prime means for raising income and relieving poverty in locales needing those most. Beyond all that, fruit trees hold fragile lands together, combating such encroaching calamities as deforestation, soil erosion, water pollution, desertification, urban blight, and perhaps even climate change. Not many people willfully cut down a fruit tree, and that fact of life could and should be capitalized upon for the common good.
The advancement of local fruits can be jump-started by community initiatives as well as pioneers who undertake such tasks as:
•Locating superior varieties;
•Developing growth, harvest, and maintenance routines;
• Improving storage, handling, packing, and packaging to improve
market acceptability and reduce devastating losses;
•Instituting standards and controls that improve quality, even to the level demanded by exports;
•Increasing individual and institutional awareness;
xxi
•Opening supplies to competition, fostering the vital price differentials that induce growers to excel; or
•Developing markets and the infrastructure (physical, legal, and mental) to compete locally and perhaps even internationally.
Table 1: Potential Roles for Selected Cultivated
African Fruits …………………………………………………………… ………..7
Overcoming Malnutrition …………………………………………….. ………8
Boosting Food Security……………………………………………………….11
Fostering Rural Development ………………………………………………14
Sustainable Landcare …………………………………………………………18
Descriptions and Assessments of Individual Species
1   Balanites (Balanites aegyptiaca)………………………………… …….23
2   Baobab (Adansonia digitata) …………………………………….. ……41
3   Butterfruit (Dacryodes edulis) ………………………………….. ……..61
4   Carissa (Carissaspecies) ………………………………………….. ……77
5   Horned Melon (Cucumis metulifer)…………………………… ……..89
6   Kei Apple (Dovyalis caffra) …………………………………….. …….103
7   Marula (Sclerocarya birrea) ……………………………………. …….117
8   Melon (Cucumis melo) ……………………………………………. …..135
9   Tamarind (Tamarindus indica)……………………………………….. 149
10 Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) ……………………………………… 165
Part 2 – Wild Fruits
Introduction …………………………………………………………………… 185
Summaries of Individual Species……………………………….. 189
Table 2: Potential Roles for Selected Wild
African Fruits ……………………………………………………….. 194
Overcoming Malnutrition …………………………………………. 195
Boosting Food
Security……………………………………………… 199
Fostering Rural Development ……………………………………. 203
Sustainable Landcare ……………………………………………….. 207
Wild Fruit Issues
Increasing Wild Fruit Usage…………………………………… …….211
Developing Wild Fruits ……………………………………………….. 212
Nutrition ……………………………………………………………………. 214
Sustainable Forestry………………………………………………. ……215
Social Difficulties …………………………………………………… …..216
1 Aizen (Mukheit) (Boscia species) ……………………………. ….221
2 Chocolate Berries (Vitexspecies) ……………………………. ….235
3 Custard Apples (Annona species)……………………………. …243
4 Ebony (Diospyros species) ……………………………………….. 253
5 Gingerbread Plums (Parinari and kindred genera) …. …….263
6 Gumvines (Landolphia and Saba species)………………… …271
7 Icacina (Icacinaspecies)…………………………………………. …281
8 Imbe (Garcinia livingstonii) ……………………………………. ….291
9 Medlars (Vangueria species) …………………………………… ..301
10 Monkey Oranges (Strychnos species) ……………………….309
11 Star Apples ( Chrysophyllum and related genera) ……….317
12 Sugarplums (Uapaca species) ………………………………… 325
13 Sweet Detar (Detarium senegalense) …………………………331
14 Tree Grapes (Lannea species)………………………………….. 339
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