Who ‘s got the dime bags now? HEMP FARMS FOR POOR AND BLACKS TOO

California Governor Jerry Brown Signs Hemp Bill SB 566! Vote Hemp and the Hemp Industries Association (HIA) are excited to report that Governor Jerry Brown has signed SB 566, the California Industrial Hemp Farming Act. After moving smoothly through the California legislature with strong bi-partisan support, this landmark legislation has now become California law. Introduced by Senator Mark Leno earlier this year, SB 566 ensures that California is prepared to begin registering hemp farmers once the federal government has given states the green light. The California Industrial Hemp Farming Act will establish a framework for farming the oilseed and fiber varieties of the plant, which are used in a myriad of everyday consumer products, including food, body care, clothing, paper, auto parts, composites, building materials, and bio-fuels.

Minnesota’s bill is waiting for approval, with no arrests Expected along with  California Governor Jerry Brown Signed Hemp Bill SB 566!
Vote Hemp and the Hemp Industries Association (HIA) are excited to report that Governor Jerry Brown has signed SB 566, the California Industrial Hemp Farming Act. After moving smoothly through the California legislature with strong bi-partisan support, this landmark legislation has now become California law. Introduced by Senator Mark Leno earlier this year, SB 566 ensures that California is prepared to begin registering hemp farmers once the federal government has given states the green light. The California Industrial Hemp Farming Act will establish a framework for farming the oilseed and fiber varieties of the plant, which are used in a myriad of everyday consumer products, including food, body care, clothing, paper, auto parts, composites, building materials, and bio-fuels.

BLACKS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN FAMILIAR WITH WHAT IS KNOWN AS THE HEMP PLANT

Where are our hemp farms ?

African slavery in the South was largely a response to the greater demand for labor on tobacco, rice, and indigo plantations.

While President Obama is busying himself with other GOP Crises emergencies, Vermont’s Assembly has voted to approve a measure, which already passed the Senate, to allow licensed hemp cultivation to begin production by the end of this summer. Under current Vermont law, hemp has technically been legalized, but, like Kentucky’s new hemp law, a provision was included that makes hemp cultivation contingent on a change in federal law.

This measure – Senate Bill 157 – which now heads to the governor for final approval, would remove this provision, blatantly flouting federal law in order to bring the state the much-needed revenue and jobs that a legalized hemp market could supply.

“It really is one of the most versatile plants there is. I can’t think of any more versatile that you can build with, eat and make clothes out of,” stated Representative Teo Zagar, a Democrat, “If Vermont takes the lead on this, and we have Vermont natural hemp products, it could be huge. We could have a huge export market opportunity.” Zagar was one of 127 representatives who voted to approve the measure – only 4 voted against the proposal. The measure is expected to be signed into law by the governor, signaling yet another massive victory in the movement to end hemp and cannabis prohibition.

With a market that congressional research indicates consists of over 25,000 various products, it’s about time we end the absurdity, and start taking advantage of this incredibly diverse industrial commodity. – TheJointBlog 

Another one of the reasons has finally come forth. The U.S. Constitution was created by free white “PreamblePeople.” This is to say; there is a Declaration that holds the “Black People“and poor/middle class people as “second class” or less citizens.

Clearly,

The Preamble and the Constitution is addressing to only men and women of their own kind. They established it to promote Christian laws with Christian principles. Like after like, kind after kind.

A clear and precise understanding that, ’WE The People’ was known and understood to mean the people of the white race and none other. The Preamble emanated from and for the people so designated by the words “to ourselves and our posterity” Black’s always worked well with the hemp plant–But landed in jail by the millions.

Marijuana Laws in Minnesota Marijuana, or Cannabis, is a plant that has been used by humans for many thousands of years – including its main uses as fiber (Hemp – especially the male plants) and as a psychoactive agent (Marijuana – the female plants).
This was true all over the world, as well as in the United States – though Marijuana use was associated more with the warmer climate areas of the world.  In fact, 389_George_Washington_as_a_FarmerGeorge Washington himself grew Cannabis on his farm.  There was no such thing as a criminal law prohibiting Marijuana.Until the 1930s in the United States, that is.  Now, in the early 21st Century, it appears that our Nation is coming to its senses again, and may soon End Prohibition again, and Re-Legalize Marijuana.  In the meantime however,Minnesota still has laws making possession or sale of Marijuana a crime.  Here is a summary of those Minnesota laws.Criminal Laws relating to Marijuana in Minnesota are primarily state and federal statutes.  A criminal case related to Marijuana in Minnesota could potentially be prosecuted in either state of federal court (or both), depending upon the facts claimed by police, and upon the exercise of prosecutorial discretion.Minnesota State or Federal Court?

votehemp1

Minnesota Statutes Chapter 152 “Drugs, Controlled Substances
Most of the criminal statutes relating to marijuana are contained in Chapter 152 of Minnesota Statutes.  In Section 152.02, Subd. 2 “Schedule 1,” marijuana is defined as “Schedule 1,” reflecting the current federal legal scheme.  The felony drug crimes are mostly laid out, ironically, as “Controlled Substances Crimes” from “first degree” (the most serious) to “fifth degree.”  Marijuana is one of several drugs made criminal in these statutes.  (Possession of alcohol is no longer a crime.)340_cannabis_sativa_-_medical_drawing


CASH FOR KIDS PREY FOR PRISON INDUSTRY.What is “Sale?”
One interesting feature of the current criminal legal scheme is the legislative arrogance of defining “cultivation” to mean “manufacture;” and then, to define “manufacture” to mean “sell.”  (If you grow a tomato in your backyard and eat it right off the vine, fresh, according to the logic of current Minnesota law, by doing so you have “sold” a tomato!)

So, first Let us see how to make sure the prosperity will go to you  and your own grand children as prescribed by the Constitution.  In that,”POSTERITY means 1. Descendants; children, children’s children of the drafter’s free whites only leaving out the poor from here and forever more.

Description
Industrial hemp industry development and regulation provided, rulemaking authorized, possession and cultivation of industrial hemp defense provided, and marijuana definition modified.

6.7    Sec. 19. [18K.02] PURPOSE.
6.8The legislature finds that the development and use of industrial hemp can improve 
6.9the state’s economy and agricultural vitality and the production of industrial hemp can 
6.10be regulated so as not to interfere with the strict regulation of controlled substances in 
6.11this state. The purpose of the Industrial Hemp Development Act is to promote the state 
6.12economy and agriculture industry by permitting the development of a regulated industrial 
6.13hemp industry while maintaining strict control of marijuana.
7.19    Sec. 23. [18K.06] INDUSTRIAL HEMP PRODUCTION; NOTIFICATION.
7.20(a) Annually, a licensee must file with the commissioner:
7.21(1) documentation showing that the seeds planted are of a type and variety certified 
7.22to contain no more than three-tenths of one percent tetrahydrocannabinol; and
7.23(2) a copy of any contract to grow industrial hemp.
7.24(b) A licensee must notify the commissioner of the sale or distribution of any 
7.25industrial hemp grown by the licensee, including, but not limited to, the name and address 
7.26of the person or entity receiving the industrial hemp and the amount of industrial hemp sold.

7.27    Sec. 24. [18K.07] RULEMAKING.
7.28(a) The commissioner shall make rules dealing with, but not limited to:
7.29(1) supervising and inspecting industrial hemp during its growth and harvest;
7.30(2) testing industrial hemp during growth to determine tetrahydrocannabinol levels;
7.31(3) assessing a fee commensurate with the costs of the commissioner’s activities in 
7.32licensing, testing, and supervising industrial hemp production;
7.33(4) using the results of the background checks authorized in section 18K.05 as 
7.34criteria for approving or denying an application for industrial hemp licensure; and
8.1(5) any other rule or procedure necessary to carry out the purposes of this chapter.
8.2(b) Rules made under this section must be consistent with the rules of the United 
8.3States Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration, regarding the production, 
8.4distribution, and sale of industrial hemp.

8.5    Sec. 25. [18K.08] FEES.
8.6Fees collected under this chapter must be credited to the industrial hemp account, 
8.7which is hereby established in the agricultural fund in the state treasury. Interest earned in 
8.8the account accrues to the account. Funds in the industrial hemp account are continuously 
8.9appropriated to the commissioner to implement and enforce this chapter.

8.10    Sec. 26. [18K.09] DEFENSE FOR POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA. 
8.11It is an affirmative defense to a prosecution for the possession of marijuana under 
8.12chapter 152 if:
8.13(1) the defendant was growing industrial hemp pursuant to the provisions of this 
8.14chapter;
8.15(2) the defendant has a valid applicable controlled substances registration from the 
8.16United States Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration;
8.17(3) the defendant fully complied with all of the conditions of the controlled 
8.18substances registration; and
8.19(4) the substance in possession is industrial hemp, as defined in section 18K.03.
6.23CROP.
6.24Industrial hemp is considered an agricultural crop in this state if grown in 
6.25compliance with this chapter. A person may possess, process, sell, or buy industrial 
6.26hemp that is planted, grown, and harvested in accordance with the provisions of sections 
6.2718K.05 and 18K.06.

6.28    Sec. 22. [18K.05] LICENSING.
6.29(a) A person growing or seeking to grow industrial hemp for commercial purposes 
6.30must apply to the commissioner for a license on a form prescribed by the commissioner.
7.1(b) The application for a license must include the name and address of the applicant 
7.2and the legal description of the land area to be used for the production of industrial hemp.
7.3(c) The commissioner must require each first-time applicant for a license to submit 
7.4to a background investigation conducted by the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension as a 
7.5condition of licensure. As part of the background investigation, the Bureau of Criminal 
7.6Apprehension must conduct criminal history checks of Minnesota records and is authorized 
7.7to exchange fingerprints with the Federal Bureau of Investigation for the purpose of a 
7.8criminal background check of the national files. The cost of the investigation must be paid 
7.9by the applicant. Criminal history records provided to the commissioner under this section 
7.10must be treated as private data on individuals, as defined in section 13.02, subdivision 12.
7.11(d) Prior to issuing a license under the provisions of this chapter, the commissioner 
7.12must determine that the applicant has complied with all applicable requirements of 
7.13the United States Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration, for the 
7.14production, distribution, and sale of industrial hemp.
7.15(e) If the applicant has completed the application process to the satisfaction of the 
7.16commissioner, the commissioner must issue a license which is valid until December 31 
7.17of the year of application. An individual licensed under this section is presumed to be 
7.18growing industrial hemp for commercial purposes.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s